This blog has long list of items that try to correct the  – frankly put – lies of Tomi Ahonen. This is the index page. So if you came here to check for some claim of Tomi Ahonen, this is the right place to start.
Any content from this blog can be copied freely.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

1. Nokia before 2011 (Symbian-powered Nokia)

1.1. Review by Tomi Ahonen from January 2011

1.2. The year 2010 Nokia compared to its competitors – size, growth, etc.

1.3. Year 2010 market shares of Nokia

1.4. Tomi Ahonen rewrite of Nokia market share history

1.5. The “expert consensus” of Nokia growth pattern from year 2010

1.6. Nokia’s feature phone to smart phone transition turnaround

1.7. “Nokia was winning with Symbian”

1.8. Nokia ex-employees interviews – History of Nokia ca. 2003-2011

2. The “Elop Effect”

2.1. The Burning Platform memo and Tomi Ahonen

2.2. Elop Effect on Nokia compared to Blackberry (formerly RIM)

2.3. Elop Effect compared to other smartphone manufacturers

2.4. Elop Effect in Kantar statistics

2.5. Why Elop Effect could not have been the reason of crash of Nokia

2.6. Market share crash of 2010 and what it means in practice

2.7. The “Promise of 1:1 transition from Symbian to Windows Phone”

2.8. Estimation of the lost sales caused by Elop Effect

3. Sales Boycott of Nokia

3.1. Global operator boycott of Nokia due to Microsoft Skype acquisition

3.2. CEO Stephen Elop admitting the Skype-based boycott

3.3. Operator boycott as seen in Finland

3.4. Evidence of the global operator boycott

3.5 Global operator boycott of Windows Phone 8 devices

3.6 Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates statement about mobile strategy

4. MeeGo

4.1. The magical Der Stern review

4.2. Nokia 950, Meltemi and related

4.3. How many N9 did Nokia sell?

4.4. Other sources about MeeGo and the state of it.

5. Nokia Lumia

5.1. High return rates of Lumia phones

5.2. Low resales value of Lumia phones

5.3. The rejection of Lumia as seen in Yankee survey

5.4. The list of 13 systematic faults of Nokia Lumia

5.5. The 101 reasons (or 121 reasons or 125 reasons) not to buy Windows Phone

5.6. Symbian user conversion to Windows Phone

5.7. Osborne effect of Windows 7.x phones and the severity of it

6. China Mobile

6.1 China market numbers as presented by Tomi Ahonen

6.2. China mobile rejection of Lumia and Nokia 801T

6.3. China mobile rejection of Lumia part II

6.4. China mobile rejection of Lumia continued

7. Tomi Ahonen biography

7.1. Biography of Tomi Ahonen

7.2. Most influential by Forbes

7.3. Forecast accuracy

7.4. Influence of Tomi Ahonen towards public

7.5. Professionality

8. Miscellaneous

8.1. Touch screen misinformation

8.2. Claim of Nokia having sold its mobile ad unit

8.3. The size of Nokia Money, the service

8.4. Misuse of graphs to a level beyond all belief

1. NOKIA BEFORE 2011 (SYMBIAN-POWERED NOKIA)

1.1. Review by Tomi Ahonen from January 2011

Currently Tomi Ahonen is saying that during fourth quarter 2010 Nokia was making a come-back and growing past competition. However, he said totally opposite in January 2011, after Nokia had released fourth quarter results but before Nokia announced Microsoft strategy.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link).

1.2. The year 2010 Nokia compared to its competitors – size, growth, etc.

As just said, currently Tomi Ahonen claims that in 2010 Nokia was “MORE than twice as big as its nearest rivals“, “more than twice as big as Apple and more than four times as big as Samsung” and that “Nokia grew more than its rivals“. However, these can all be seen to be not true from – ironically – his own numbers he handed out in 2010.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

1.3. Year 2010 market shares of Nokia

Tomi Ahonen remembers to say that prior to Windows Phone strategy Nokia had market share of 90% in Finland and 77% in China. Correct numbers are 67% and 56%, respectively. The essential info here is that Nokia had those market shares in the past, but both had come down during year 2010 when Nokia was still having Symbian/MeeGo based strategy.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

1.4. Tomi Ahonen rewrite of Nokia market share history

In global scale Tomi Ahonen has the nerve to claim that “Nokia 2009 market share was 39% and in 2010 that declined the normal level to 34%, there was no ‘collapse’ happening during 2010.” As previously mentioned, he reported the collapse himself and it is not from 39% to 34% during full year but from 39% to 28% during 6 months.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

1.5. The “expert consensus” of Nokia growth pattern from year 2010

Tomi Ahonen often says that “The consensus view of the big analyst houses in year 2010 was that Symbian would continue to dominate the smartphone market”, sometimes saying that consensus reached as far as up to year 2015. Unfortunately, the “consensus” he refers to was not valid even at end of 2010, far less 2011, 2012 or 2013.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

1.6. Nokia’s feature phone to smart phone transition turnaround

According to Tomi Ahonen Nokia’s transition from feature phones to smart phones turned around and percentage of feature phones compared to smartphones started to increase after February 2011 strategy change. Unfortunately that took place already in 2010.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

1.7. “Nokia was winning with Symbian”

All of the above have piled up to point that Tomi Ahonen has stated multiple times either that “Nokia was winning” or “Symbian was winning”. That is a combination of the false claims stated above, with some additional twists.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

1.8. Nokia ex-employees interviews – History of Nokia ca. 2003-2011

In contrast, I have gathered together translation of Finnish articles that were based on interviews of laid-off Nokians. It shows quite a different Nokia than one would understand from posts of Tomi Ahonen.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

2. The “Elop Effect”

2.1. The Burning Platform memo and Tomi Ahonen

Despite what he has written about the Burning Platform Memo later, Tomi Ahonen agreed with the memo when it was originally published. He even said this:

I CLEARLY stated in my blog that i AGREE with the sentiment of the supposed Elop ‘memo’ but I find several statements in it erroneous or bizarre – I am of course deleting all comments that suggest I am somehow in ‘denial’ about Nokia’s troubles and comments that suggest I think Nokia is doing just fine.
The rules on this blog are clear, that you have to read the article before you are allowed to comment. Anyone who is not adult enough to understand basic English when I clearly both in opening to the blog – and in the conclusion of hte article I repeat myself, saying about the supposed memo that its ‘sentiment is right’. I only take offense to the errors and bizarre issues in the memo. All who try to waste the time of my regular readers, by posting comments that were not related to the actual blog article as I wrote it, are now deleted.

Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

2.2. Elop Effect on Nokia compared to Blackberry (formerly RIM)

Considering the claim of Tomi Ahonen that Nokia was in excellent shape in 2010 and “Elop effect” ruined it, it is rather interesting to compare it to another well-performing company from 2010 – Blackberry. They have almost identical curve what comes to them going down.
This has been addressed twice. More detailed version is here: (visit link)
whereas more descriptive comparison is here: (visit link)

2.3. Elop Effect compared to other smartphone manufacturers

Blackberry is not the only one to mysteriously being affected by “Nokia-only” Elop Effect. Also several Android manufacturers took hit. It makes one question how come Elop was able to sink those too?
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

2.4. Elop Effect in Kantar statistics

According to Tomi Ahonen Kantar statistics show crash from 2010 to 2011, due to “Elop Effect” (i.e. Windows Phone strategy announcement). Interestingly, the very data he uses tells us that Nokia market share in UK (the market he uses as an example) drops from 33% to 23% to 12%…
…before February 2011. So in fact Nokia lost almost two thirds of the market before they even had announced a new strategy!
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

2.5. Why Elop Effect could not have been the reason of crash of Nokia

As can be guessed from previous, Nokia was already losing market share in 2010, way before Windows Phone strategy was announced. However, the growth of smartphone market as a whole kept Nokia’s sales numbers still increasing, although way slower than competition. The real drop happens in Q1 2011 when market growth halted. Conveniently, mid-February strategy change actually cannot affect sales of Q1 2011, which means that quarter shows the unit sales would have crashed even without the strategy change.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

2.6. Market share crash of 2010 and what it means in practice

Nokia lost over 25% of its market share in six months during 2010. That is – as Tomi Ahonen said early 2011 – pretty much unprecedented. Tomi Ahonen had a suitable comparison for it. He puts Toyota (largest car manufacturer at the time) to lose quarter of its market share:
If Toyota lost one quarter of its market, and instead of selling 8.4 million cars, they would only sell 6.3 million cars. Toyota would fall behind General Motors, AND Renault-Nissan AND even behind Volkswagen Group, landing in 4th place, just ahead of Ford Motor Company.
That’s the size of the crash Nokia had in 2010 and it is not something that gets automatically fixed, either.
I have explained what market share (and loss of it) means in practice. It’s here: (visit link)

2.7. The “Promise of 1:1 transition from Symbian to Windows Phone”

Tomi Ahonen has been (in increasing amount) referring to “Elop did promise his new Windows strategy would achieve a 1-to-1 transition from Symbian to Windows Phone“. This – of course – is a lie. No such thing was promised. Instead Tomi Ahonen has taken Nokia illustrative graph (clearly labeled with “For illustrative purposes only; Not a forecast”), re-edited it and uses it as “promise Elop gave” to prove his claim. At the same occasion he usually also states that Nokia had three pillars of strategy, which is not true either.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

2.8. Estimation of the lost sales caused by Elop Effect

From the starting points listed so far it probably does not surprise anybody that the estimate Tomi Ahonen has made about damage to Nokia by the Windows Phone strategy is about one order of magnitude too high. The analogy behind it combines multiple falsified data together.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

3. Sales Boycott of Nokia

3.1. Global operator boycott of Nokia due to Microsoft Skype acquisition

In brief, what Tomi Ahonen claims is that “right after Microsoft bought Skype, the Windows based smartphones were put on a sales boycott globally“. Unsurprisingly, claim has no evidence to back it up, far less makes even sense.
Full article about lack of evidence and how much sense it makes is here: (visit link)

3.2. CEO Stephen Elop admitting the Skype-based boycott

Considering there is full evidence (including video record of the actual speech) to counter it, it is amazing that Tomi Ahonen still has energy to claim that “Elop says, the reason carriers hate Windows Phone smartphones is because Microsoft now owns Skype – and Elop tells us some have gone as far to stop selling any Windows smarpthones not just Lumias.
The whole claim is indeed a lie, nothing more.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

3.3. Operator boycott as seen in Finland

Considering Lumia 800 was most sold smartphone in Finland for year 2012, it is interesting that Tomi Ahonen states Finnish operators have previously mentioned “boycott” in use. Of course it is even more interesting when one finds out he is falsifying news articles to prove it.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

3.4. Evidence of the global operator boycott

So Tomi Ahonen says Nokia’s poor sales are a result of sales boycott caused by February 2011 announcement. For sake of argument we can assume the boycott is true…
…but in that case it started prior to February 2011.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

3.5 Global operator boycott of Windows Phone 8 devices

Tomi Ahonen has expanded his boycott claim to cover also Windows Phone 8. Only problem is that we don’t see the boycott actually taking place anywhere.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

3.6 Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates statement about mobile strategy

Very recently (as per time of this post) Tomi Ahonen did similar rewrite of truth to Bill Gates interview as he did earlier to Skype statement of Stephen Elop. Once again, there is a video available.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

4. MeeGo

4.1. The magical Der Stern review

In words of Tomi Ahonen N9 got amazing review from German magazine:

Understand, this is not a technology magazine, Der Stern is a general weekly newsmagazine like Time in the USA, yet it chose to review a smarpthone not even sold in Germany and so loved it, recommended readers fly to other countries to go get one.

Now this is blatant lie. First of all, Tomi Ahonen claims that Der Stern does not normally do technology reviews, yet the article is in “Digital -> Phones” section of the magazine, just like Lumia 800 review he doesn’t even bother to mention.
The review at no point “recommends readers to fly to other countries to get one“, yet it does say that the phone is worth to take a look at on your next trip to Austria (where Germans travel often, thanks to good highway access).
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

4.2. Nokia 950, Meltemi and related

Tomi Ahonen reveals us his incompetence in technology from time to time with his statements on N900 and N950. More specifically: “Because the N9 is currently in production and selling highly profitably (and sister phones such as N950 and N900 have been produced and could be manufactured within weeks of ramp-up time)
Now do understand he is talking about porting N9 Harmattan Swipe UI to N900. That means support for resistive display, different display resolution and QWERTY keyboard – “within weeks of ramp-up time”. Furthermore, he has suggested that Nokia could “release the N900, the N9 and the N950 on Android, like next month!” (which means  in 42 days). Proper time estimates for any of the previous would be in months, not weeks.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

4.3. How many N9 did Nokia sell?

Tomi Ahonen remembers to tell that N9 outsold Lumias in Q4 2011 and Q1 2012. Unfortunately that is not true and he has numbers that are taken from commenters in a web forum. (Yes, from two average Joes.) Real smartphone sales reports do not have room for numbers he provides.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

4.4. Other sources about MeeGo and the state of it.

For those who want to read a bit different review on MeeGo the OS, Finnish site Taskumuro interviewed ex-Nokia employees and got quite different story indeed. It is called “Story of Nokia MeeGo” and short version with link to actual article can be found here: (visit link)

5. Nokia Lumia

5.1. High return rates of Lumia phones

Greatest and most long-lasting claim about Lumia line from Tomi Ahonen seems to be that it has “highest return rates of any Nokia smartphone ever”. This is all without a single valid proof. In addition to that it is a very challenging task for any product to gain that record after 2009.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

5.2. Low resales value of Lumia phones

On his attempt to prove the Lumia line a failure Tomi Ahonen invented claim that Lumia phones have resales value of “already zero”. Unfortunately that is not true on any measurement and easy to verify to be false claim.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

5.3. The rejection of Lumia as seen in Yankee survey

Another claim form Tomi Ahonen is that Yankee Survey shows that “4 out of 10 rate the Lumia as literally the worst phone possible“. One could make that conclusion. On the other hand one can then also make the conclusion that 3 out of 10 in the same survey rate it the best phone ever – or there is something seriously wrong in the survey itself.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

5.4. The list of 13 systematic faults of Nokia Lumia

Tomi Ahonen repeatedly says that “Nokia Lumia series has 13 systematic faults why it fails in all markets including the USA“. He presents the list as some universal fact although he is the author of the list. Also: 5 of those 13 items are just plain lies and can be proven such, whereas 4 of those 13 items are just “None of the Lumia phones has HW QWERTY keyboard” put into some form.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

5.5. The 101 reasons (or 121 reasons or 125 reasons) not to buy Windows Phone

Since there was “101 reasons not to buy Windows Phone” list published in the web, Tomi Ahonen has been referring to it a lot. Please understand he has not made the list, nor am I trying to claim that. But to cut it short:

    • 31 “reasons not to buy” are not true at all.
    • 27 reasons could be somehow qualified as “reason not to buy” (both Windows Phone 7.8 and Windows Phone 8 correct some of those 27).
    • All other reasons (67 of them) are either duplicates or…
      …I’m incapable of finding a proper word. Silly? Try these:

30. Wifi- hotspot and internet tethering not integral features in the OS but need to be provided by manufacturer on a case by case basis.
(Yes, you read it right: there is WiFi hotspot, you can use it, it works fine but since it is “not integral feature in the OS”, this guy refuses to buy the device.)
60. Option to output FM radio to speaker is cleverly hidden.
(You guessed it, he failed the very basic gesture of “tap-and-hold to see options list” so it is now “reason not to buy”.)

Full article about the most biased list ever seen is here: (visit link)

5.6. Symbian user conversion to Windows Phone

Elop did not promise 1:1 transition from Symbian to Windows Phone (as said before). Tomi Ahonen has claimed so still and tried to twist numbers to prove it. That includes use of Kantar (again), but he chooses both wrong markets and wrong time to do that (unless one wants to fake the data, that is).
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

5.7. Osborne effect of Windows 7.x phones and the severity of it

Tomi Ahonen says Lumia line of Windows Phone 7.x was “osborned” in 2012. There was a sales impact, yes, but interestingly Lumia 800 scored most selling phone in Finland still in January 2013 when Windows Phone 8 devices were already in shops. Not to mention Tomi Ahonen did not find such problem when Symbian went through similar switch.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

6. China Mobile

6.1 China market numbers as presented by Tomi Ahonen

According to Tomi Ahonen China Telecom (operator selling Lumia 800C) would have 6% of Chinese mobile subscriptions. In fact it had (at time of article) 14% of the Chinese Market (146 Million subs), making them the World’s biggest CDMA operator and bigger than Verizon or AT&T. Bigger than either of previous AND T-Mobile US – combined.
At the same time we get China Mobile, which Tomi Ahonen claims to have 72% of the Chinese market. That – naturally – is also a bit far from the truth as China Mobile holds 66% of that market. (Tomi has “minor” error of 63 million subscribers, almost twice the size of entire T-Mobile US).
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

6.2. China mobile rejection of Lumia and Nokia 801T

Now the reason to twist China Mobile size compared to other Chinese operators is that at that time China Mobile did not sell any Windows Phone product.
One of the most incredible stories from Tomi Ahonen is his claim that Nokia 801T (Symbian phone) would be “reverse-engineered” version of Lumia 800, where (in his words) “China mobile essentially forced Nokia to go back and reverse engineer the Lumia to take Windows out and put Symbian in“.
Not only does he bypass the fact that those two products so not share any properties (they have different casing, physical dimensions, display size, display resolution, chipset, processor, RF,…) but also he ignores the fact that Lumia 800 could not have worked in the TD-SCDMA network China Mobile uses, reverse engineered or not.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

6.3. China mobile rejection of Lumia part II

To continue the previous “forced Nokia to reverse engineer the Lumia to take Windows out and put Symbian in” – fairy tale (and his ignorance on incompatible network technologies) Tomi Ahonen went to claim that China Mobile “refused” to take any Lumia models from Nokia (which was supposed to prove China Mobile wa against Nokia’s strategy change, ignoring that the models were still incompatible with the network).
When Windows Phone 8 added the support for chipset required to support China Mobile networks, Tomi Ahonen sticked to that claim, saying China Mobile is not taking any Lumias. That means active denial of news for about 3 months.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

6.4. China mobile rejection of Lumia continued

To finalize the sequence in question, Nokia finally made public announcement with China Mobile that Lumia 920T is coming to China Mobile. Instead of admitting he was wrong with his statement about China Mobile saying “refused to  take any Lumia at all“, Tomi Ahonen has now a new story to fix the situation in his favor: “Microsoft and Nokia threw money at China Mobile“. Quite an achievement, considering it’s been years now and we still haven’t seen iPhone being sold by China Mobile. Doesn’t Apple have money to “throw at China Mobile”?
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

7. Tomi Ahonen biography

7.1. Biography of Tomi Ahonen

When Tomi Ahonen calls himself ex-Nokia Executive, he seems to forget few details worth mentioning. Such as the fact he has only worked in networks unit (not in Mobile Phones or smartphones) or the fact he therefore has no past or present inside info about Nokia’s handset business.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

7.2. Most influential by Forbes

Tomi Ahonen remembers to say he is most influential mobile expert globally as rated by Forbes. It is true that a contributor to the publication listed Tomi Ahonen as such in January 2012. It is also true that the same contributor removed Tomi Ahonen from the list in May 2012 and has not updated him back ever since.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

7.3. Forecast accuracy

Tomi Ahonen calls himself “most accurate forecaster”. His method seems to base on making forecasts every few months and later choosing the one that hit most closest. I call it lottery, if the more up-to-date forecasts do not outdate the previous ones. I let my readers judge if they see it as proper method to do forecasts.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

7.4. Influence of Tomi Ahonen towards public

The reason I started to do this blog was because Tomi Ahonen was being seen as a credible source of Nokia related info. By now we know he is not. A sad example is a blog posting done by a person who had been reading blog of Tomi Ahonen. That post has interesting statements, e.g. saying that when Stephen Elop took the reins of Nokia, the company had 60% market share in smartphones. (correct number would be 33%).
The post in question listed carrier boycott, high return rates of Lumias, about all of the above and the poor writer had not checked a single “fact” before writing his text.
It’s sad.
And frightening.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

7.5. Professionality

(This paragraph has been added later)
First of all it should be noted that ever since Nokia switched to Windows Phone the behaviour of Tomi Ahonen has been classless. Here is one example of it: (visit link)
I did an open letter to Tomi Ahonen where I tried to point it out that his behaviour (foul language, twisting numbers, misinterpreting people’s statements, inventing conspiracy theories, spreading lies, etc.) is going to give unprofessional image of him and eventually destroy both his reputation and income. The full letter is here: (visit link)

Did he take the advice? Of course not. I made a blog post about that too, but here’s more recent from Twitter:
calling_with_names
Professional behaviour? My kids behave better.

8. Miscellaneous

8.1. Touch screen misinformation

According to Tomi Ahonen only 38% of all smartphones sold now are touch-screen smartphones. (For all mobile phones he had 37%.) Both numbers are impossible. Especially since OS requirements already demand that over 90% of smartphones must have had a touch screen. That extends to point that if 37% of all phones were equipped with touch screens, they would all be smartphones (which would mean e.g. there are no Asha-line feature phones with touch screen sold at all).
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

8.2. Claim of Nokia having sold its mobile ad unit

According To Tomi Ahonen Nokia sold its mobile advertisement unit to Matchbin (later known as Radiate Media).
In reality Nokia sold NAVTEQ’s Radio and Television Advertising Group to Matchbin.
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

8.3. The size of Nokia Money, the service

According to Tomi Ahonen “Nokia had recruited 1.2 million paying consumers to its Nokia Money service“, meaning that “Nokia had achieved a 12% market share in India” before Nokia shut down the service.
In reality Nokia had 100,000 to 200,000 (exact number unknown, reported numbers fall between those) paying consumers listed so assuming rest of the math is correct, Nokia had 1% – 2% of market share in India in its Nokia Money service and 10% – 11% of the market share in co-operation with banks (co-operation was not reported to having been shut down).
Full article about the subject is here: (visit link)

8.4. Misuse of graphs to a level beyond all belief

As final task I would like to invite all the readers to take a test. Since sum of all parts of net sales are 100% of the total, how can you sum up all the parts and get only 40%? (Trick question, you can’t.)
Tomi Ahonen has found a way. Detailed explanation is here: (visit link)